Hot Topics

Poll

Governments can ration access to cancer drugs, or break patent monopolies. Why is rationing so popular?:

Conclusions of 23rd session of WIPO Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights

World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO)
Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights (SCCR)
Twenty–Third Session
Geneva, November 21 to 25, 28, 29 and December 2, 2011
Conclusions

Limitations and Exceptions: Libraries and archives

WIPO releases text on an international instrument on L&Es for persons with print disabilities: SCCR/23/7 Prov

On Friday, 2 December 2011, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) released an official paper, dated 1 December 2011, entitled "Working Document on an International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities" prepared by the "Secretariat on the (to be adopted by the Committee during the SCCR/23 session)." This document, numbered as SCCR/23/7 Prov., is expected to be adopted today by the SCCR. SCCR/23/7 Prov can be found here:

WIPO study on Anti-Competitive Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights (Sham Litigation)

Lucia Helena Salgado, from Coordinator of Regulatory and Market Studies, institute of Research on Applied Economics (IPEA) is presenting her study on Anti-Competitive Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights (Sham Litigation) at the 7th session of the WIPO Advisory Committee on Enforcement.

The report can be found here:

http://wipo.int/export/sites/www/meetings/en/2011/wipo_ip_ge_11/docs/stu...

WIPO releases new working document on an international instrument on L&Es for persons with print disabilities

On Monday, 28 November 2011, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) released a new document called "Working Document on an International Instrument on Limitations and Exceptions for Persons with Print Disabilities" prepared by the "Secretariat on the basis of comments made by Member States delegations to the Chair's document SCCR/22/16" on 25 November 2011.

The new document can be found here: http://keionline.org/sites/default/files/Workingdocument_VIP.doc or http://keionline.org/sites/default/files/Workingdocument_VIP.pdf

European versus American interpretations of orphan works

The WIPO Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights (SCCR) is now discussing the topic of orphan works in deliberations on limitations and exceptions for libraries and archives. The US has a broader view of what constitutes an orphan work compared with the European Union. Here are the interventions of both the US and EU taken from the WIPO lives stream for comparison.

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

WIPO SCCR discusses modalities for text based discussions on libraries and archives

Wednesday, Morning Session
23 November 2011

General statement of the United States of America at SCCR 23

The United States delivered its general statement to the 23rd session of the WIPO Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights (SCCR) on Monday, 21 November 2011. The following text is captured from WIPO's live stream of this meeting.

General statement of Knowledge Ecology International at SCCR 23 supporting TVI and AV treaty and opposing Broadcasting Treaty

General statement of Knowledge Ecology International
SCCR 23
21 November 2011

The SCCR is beginning a long meeting that will attempt to address proposals for norm setting on copyright limitations and exceptions, and for related rights for audiovisual performances and broadcasting organizations.

Pharma company registered lobbying expenditures for USA

According to OpenSecrets.Org, the pharmaceutical manufacturing sector has reported $115,571,832 in lobbying for 2011, a number that will grow considerably when all quarterly reports are filed. The top lobbying outlays were reported by PhRMA, the trade association, followed by Pfizer, Amgen, Merck, Lilly, Novartis, Bayer and GSK. The top generic company was Teva, which ranked 12th overall. As reported by OpenSecrets, some firms are listed more than once, for lobbying outlays by different subsidiaries.

WHO CEWG to pave the way for binding global convention on biomedical R&D

On Friday, 18 November 2011, the WHO Consultative Expert Working Group on research and development: financing and coordination (CEWG) held an open briefing on the results of its work thus far. This meeting was attended by delegates from Bangladesh, Brazil, the European Union, Germany, the Holy See, the Netherlands, Nigeria, Tanzania, United States in addition to representatives from the Global Fund, South Centre, WHO, WIPO, UNITAID, Berne Declaration, HAI, KEI, IFPMA, MPP, MSF and TWN.

Accessible formats for people with visual disabilities: a human right requiring a binding legal instrument

Next week, the WIPO Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights (SCCR 23) will meet beginning on 21 November and continue through 2 December 2011. One issue that will be discussed is a possible treaty for copyright limitations and exceptions for persons who are visually impaired or have other disabilities. A treaty is necessary to provide minimum standards for limitations and exceptions to permit the creation of accessible format works and also to facilitate cross-border sharing of these works.

How the US government subsidized Ron Perelman's smallpox drug: ST-246 (Tecovirimat)

On November 13, 2011, the Los Angeles Times published a story by David Willman on a no-bid contract with the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) to supply the government with a drug for smallpox. The LA Times story begins with this:

Over the last year, the Obama administration has aggressively pushed a $433-million plan to buy an experimental smallpox drug, despite uncertainty over whether it is needed or will work.

WHO Consultative Expert Working Group on R&D Financing holds open briefing on 18 November 2011 @ 5 PM in Salle C, WHO

In May 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) passed resolution WHA63.23 which established the Consultative Expert Working Group on research and development: financing and coordination (CEWG) to further "examine current financing and coordination of research and development, as well as proposals for new and innovative sources of funding to stimulate research and development related to Type II and Type III diseases and the specific research and development needs of developing countries in relation to Type I diseases, and open to consideration of proposals from Member States".

Special 301 on steroids? Section 205 of HR 3261, the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) is not just about the Internet

On October 26, 2011, a bipartisan group of members of the U.S. House of Representatives introduced HR 3261, the Stop Online Piracy Act, known as SOPA. While much of the bill deals with "online" piracy," some sections of the bill appear to have nothing to do with the Internet. The bill also creates a new bureaucracy to deal with very broadly defined trade related intellectual property rights issues, including those identified in the annual USTR Special 301 report.

Syndicate content